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Blue Waters gets going

A volume visualization of the kinetic energy shows interesting structures inside the star as the supernova process begins. Data courtesy of the Stanford Woosley PRAC team, UC Santa Cruz and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Visualization courtesy of Blue Waters visualization staff, Rob Sisneros and Dave Semeraro.

The gorgeous image of a star going supernova pictured on this issue's front page is just one of several images the Blue Waters system at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications has already generated.

A recent release on the NCSA website states:

NCSA staff members are performing application tests to ascertain Blue Waters' system and application performance. These tests, done in collaboration with the early science users, have produced datasets that are in turn being used by the Blue Waters visualization staff to test scalable visualization tools. Such tools enable science teams to explore the very large volumes of data they will produce on the full Blue Waters system. While the early visualization work is mostly concerned with software functionality, it is providing tantalizing glimpses of the early science.

To date, two visualization software packages have been installed: VisIt and Paraview.

To read more about visualization on Blue Waters, please visit the NCSA website.

A volume visualization of the kinetic energy shows interesting structures inside the star as the supernova process begins. Data courtesy of the Stanford Woosley PRAC team, UC Santa Cruz and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Visualization courtesy of Blue Waters visualization staff, Rob Sisneros and Dave Semeraro.

A volume visualization of temperature shows interesting structures inside the star as the supernova process begins. Data courtesy of the Stanford Woosley PRAC team, UC Santa Cruz and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Visualization courtesy of Blue Waters visualization staff, Rob Sisneros and Dave Semeraro.

Isosurface of the flame front colored by speed of the flame front. This is a small feature found inside the star as the supernova process begins. Data courtesy of the Stanford Woosley PRAC team, UC Santa Cruz and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Visualization courtesy of Andy Nonaka, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

Simulation of the formation and evolution of galaxies formed shortly after the Big Bang. Data courtesy the Brian O'Shea PRAC team. Visualization courtesy of Blue Waters visualization staff, Rob Sisneros and Dave Semeraro.
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