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Content about biology

April 15, 2015

Mutations pose a risk to crop yields and our ability to feed a burgeoning population. With the aid of cloud computing clusters, Cornell researchers were able to predict where bad mutations are likely to occur. Genetic editing will remove these harmful mutations and allow breeders to continue increasing yield gains.

April 15, 2015

Buying a supercomputer can be a tough sell for administrators to make. A study by Clemson University researchers may change the argument.

April 15, 2015

Cancer researchers at the University of Oslo are using the Abel supercomputer to detect which parts of the genetic code may cause bowel and prostate cancer.

April 8, 2015

Researchers from the University of Surrey, UK, have developed an iPad app that could change the way wildlife is monitored in the future. The Wildsense app loads photos of tigers from the web for analysis by players in return for points. These ‘citizen scientists’ examine these photos and provide further behavioral context that does not typically exist with the image alone. For example, how many tigers are in the image, what are the tigers doing, and what is their environment?

April 8, 2015

Using the Oakley supercomputer and a very small, frozen tuning fork, Joseph Heremans is rewriting our science textbooks. His computational research team has discovered that phonons — sound and heat particles — yield to magnetic fields.

April 8, 2015

They’re only 1/100th the width of a human hair, but these little sensors are kind of a big deal. Dubbed geometrically encoded magnetic sensors (GEMs), they have the ability to change shape once inside human tissue – and they provide greater accuracy than current technology.

April 1, 2015

Naturally occurring crystalline structures called zeolites have the ability to separate molecules, speed chemical reactions, rearrange atomic bonds, and break down long chains of hydrogen and carbon atoms. Scientists screened a large database of possible zeolite structures to find a few that can lead to cheaper ethanol and better engine lubrication. What they’ve discovered could mean greater engine efficiency and big savings for you.

April 1, 2015

Renowned computational biologist Klaus Schulten used the supercomputers at the Texas Advance Computing Center and the National Center for Supercomputing Applications to model the binding force of proteins found in cow stomachs. What he discovered may lead us to cheaper biofuel production.

March 25, 2015

 

Big data opens doors previously closed to researchers, yet the volume of data sends scientists looking for analytical tools to bring order from the informational cacophony. Prior to tools like Bioconductor, there were few options for working with quantitative data types; a discordant score for deciphering the human genetic code was the result.

Today, genomic analysis machines create a common language for users, and build a worldwide community to foster developers from among subject matter experts. These instruments make beautiful music from a mass of genomic information.

March 11, 2015

The European-Commission-funded SemaGrow project aims to introduce agricultural researchers to technologies around big data. As more and more data is published online, exciting new opportunities are arising to create added value by combining and cross-indexing heterogeneous datasets at a large scale. To make the most out of these opportunities, agricultural researchersneed access toinfrastructure that is not only efficient, responsive, and scalable, but which is also sufficiently flexible and robust to welcome data in a wide variety of forms. 

March 11, 2015

Researchers in Switzerland have taken inspiration from fossils to discover how DNA could be used to reliably store data for over two million years. They stored 83 kilobytes of data — containing the text from the Swiss Federal Charter of 1291 and the English translation of the Method of Archimedes — on DNA, which was subsequently encapsulated in silica to mimic the protective shell provided by fossilized bone. 

March 4, 2015

With the world facing unprecedented environmental challenges, it’s time to establish the field of ‘environmental computing’, argues Matti Heikkurinen, a senior advisor at Germany's Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich. 

February 18, 2015

UC San Diego School of Medicine scientists have teamed up with Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center engineers to create 3D models of enzymes that cause inflammation. What they've learned could bring relief to victims of asthma and arthritis.

 

February 11, 2015

Scientists at the University of Rochester, in New York, US, have enlisted XSEDE supercomputers in quest to conquer breast cancer. Their analyses will improve diagnostic equipment and point the way to quicker diagnoses.

February 4, 2015

To determine how early humans survived a population crash more than 100,000 years ago, archeologists looked to the Blacklight supercomputer at the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center. Initial results have shed new light on the field, and promise significant increases in predictive power.

January 21, 2015

As high-performance computers reshape the future, scientists gain the next-generation tools enabling them to see deeper into the past. Paleobiologists at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and Indiana University look to these tools to rewrite the story of the snake’s evolution.

October 29, 2014

Rainforest Connection uses simple devices created from discarded cellphones to listen out for illegal logging activities and provide rangers with real-time alerts. The organization was founded in 2012 by Topher White, who gave a talk about his work at TEDxCERN last month. White’s system has already helped stop illegal logging in Indonesia and further pilot projects are set to be launched soon in both Brazil and Cameroon.

August 20, 2014

Video courtesy AnaEE.

August 13, 2014

Next-generation sequencing (NGS), in which millions or billions of DNA nucleotides are sequenced in parallel, is the backbone of novel discoveries in life sciences, anthropology, social sciences, biomedical sciences and plant sciences. Read about the SoyKB and iPlant collaboration that is taking plant sciences to the next level.

July 2, 2014

Last week, iSGTW attended the International Supercomputing Conference (ISC’14) in Leipzig, Germany. The event featured a range of speakers representing a wide variety of research domains. Awards given by PRACE and Germany’s Gauss Centre for Supercomputing highlighted some of the outstanding research on show at the event. And, of course, the new TOP500 list of the world’s fastest supercomputers was announced.

June 4, 2014

Thanks to high-quality video links that have just become available over the Central Asia Research and Education Network (CAREN), cardiologists from Kazakhstan, Tajikistan, and Turkmenistan were recently able to take part in a conference remotely from the comfort of their hospital offices.

June 4, 2014

Video courtesy PLEASED.

Most iSGTW readers will have heard plenty of talk of 'the internet of things', especially over the past few years. But have you heard about 'the internet of livingthings'?

May 28, 2014

Last week, iSGTW attended the European Grid Infrastructure (EGI) Community Forum 2014 in Helsinki, Finland. The event saw the launch of the EGI Federated Cloud, as well as a range of exciting presentations about how grid and other e-infrastructures are being used to advance excellent science in Europe.

May 7, 2014

Video and caption courtesy CEED project. © SPECS Lab

April 30, 2014

Video and caption courtesy neuGRID4you communication team.