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21 December 2011

Few laypeople think of computing innovation in connection with the Tevatron particle accelerator, which shut down earlier this year. Mention of the Tevatron inspires images of majestic machinery, or thoughts of immense energies and groundbreaking physics research, not circuit boards, hardware, networks, and software.

Yet over the course of more than three decades of planning and operation, a tremendous amount of computing innovation was necessary to keep the data flowing and physics results coming. Those innovations will continue to influence scientific computing and data analysis for years to come.

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This year, the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) turned 10. It was September 2001 when the idea was concieved of and approved by the CERN council to handle the large volumes of data.

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What were you reading in 2011? We re-cap the most popular stories of the year.

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Spotlight

You Might Have Missed

 

Brookhaven National Laboratory is preparing for a new wave of discoveries. PHENIX is in its final runs, but superPHENIX waits in the wings.

Upgrading its PHENIX detector and Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider marks the beginning of an exciting...

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When hunting neutrinos, a more powerful particle beam increases the chance of seeing neutrinos interact. Fermilab scientists recently set a new world record for high-energy neutrino experiments with a sustained 521-kilowatt beam, and will soon...

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Discover a musical performance from the Montreux Jazz Festival that was created by converting data collected from CERN's Large Hadron Collider into musical notes.

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