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21 December 2011

Few laypeople think of computing innovation in connection with the Tevatron particle accelerator, which shut down earlier this year. Mention of the Tevatron inspires images of majestic machinery, or thoughts of immense energies and groundbreaking physics research, not circuit boards, hardware, networks, and software.

Yet over the course of more than three decades of planning and operation, a tremendous amount of computing innovation was necessary to keep the data flowing and physics results coming. Those innovations will continue to influence scientific computing and data analysis for years to come.

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This year, the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) turned 10. It was September 2001 when the idea was concieved of and approved by the CERN council to handle the large volumes of data.

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What were you reading in 2011? We re-cap the most popular stories of the year.

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Spotlight

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Researchers have used grid computing resources provided by Metacentrum, the Czech national grid infrastructure, to help design toxic-chemical-eating bacteria. The team used a combination of grid-powered mathematical modeling and laboratory...

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Open, shareable data promises to transform education, society, and economic development. Read about the National Data Service and its first pilot program, the Materials Data Facility.

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Last week, in a ceremony held at UNESCO headquarters in Paris, France, CERN and UNESCO commemorated the signature of the CERN Convention and the subsequent 60 years of science for peace.

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Last week, iSGTW attended the International Supercomputing Conference (ISC’14) in Leipzig, Germany. The event featured a range of speakers representing a wide variety of research domains. Awards given by PRACE and Germany’s...

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