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21 December 2011

Few laypeople think of computing innovation in connection with the Tevatron particle accelerator, which shut down earlier this year. Mention of the Tevatron inspires images of majestic machinery, or thoughts of immense energies and groundbreaking physics research, not circuit boards, hardware, networks, and software.

Yet over the course of more than three decades of planning and operation, a tremendous amount of computing innovation was necessary to keep the data flowing and physics results coming. Those innovations will continue to influence scientific computing and data analysis for years to come.

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This year, the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) turned 10. It was September 2001 when the idea was concieved of and approved by the CERN council to handle the large volumes of data.

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What were you reading in 2011? We re-cap the most popular stories of the year.

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Spotlight

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The University of Chicago in Illinois, US, is collaborating with the US National Cancer Institute (NCI) to establish the nation’s most comprehensive computational facility, storing cancer genomic data generated through NCI-funded research...

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Genomic analysis of modern and ancient DNA combined with archeological evidence is revealing new complexity in human history. With sophisticated genetic tools, supercomputing simulations and modeling, scientists trace the origins of modern Europeans...

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