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21 December 2011

Few laypeople think of computing innovation in connection with the Tevatron particle accelerator, which shut down earlier this year. Mention of the Tevatron inspires images of majestic machinery, or thoughts of immense energies and groundbreaking physics research, not circuit boards, hardware, networks, and software.

Yet over the course of more than three decades of planning and operation, a tremendous amount of computing innovation was necessary to keep the data flowing and physics results coming. Those innovations will continue to influence scientific computing and data analysis for years to come.

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This year, the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) turned 10. It was September 2001 when the idea was concieved of and approved by the CERN council to handle the large volumes of data.

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What were you reading in 2011? We re-cap the most popular stories of the year.

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Spotlight

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For scientists looking to complete large, complex, data-driven research projects quickly, living cyberinfrastructure can be a powerful solution. This is a different way of working for most scientists; applying for time on a machine does not...

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Last week, decision makers and technical experts from the world of IT met in Heidelberg, Germany, for the second ISC Big Data conference. The event focused on a wide range of big data applications and featured discussion of the latest developments...

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Last month, the Distributed Research Infrastructure for Hydro-Meteorology project (DRIHM) held its second summer school. The event brought together hydrometeorologists from 23 different countries, who learned about the latest computational...

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Last month, iSGTW attended the EUDAT Third Conference in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. EUDAT is facilitating efficient research by contributing towards a collaborative data infrastructure in Europe. This will enable researchers to share data...

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