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21 December 2011

Few laypeople think of computing innovation in connection with the Tevatron particle accelerator, which shut down earlier this year. Mention of the Tevatron inspires images of majestic machinery, or thoughts of immense energies and groundbreaking physics research, not circuit boards, hardware, networks, and software.

Yet over the course of more than three decades of planning and operation, a tremendous amount of computing innovation was necessary to keep the data flowing and physics results coming. Those innovations will continue to influence scientific computing and data analysis for years to come.

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This year, the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) turned 10. It was September 2001 when the idea was concieved of and approved by the CERN council to handle the large volumes of data.

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What were you reading in 2011? We re-cap the most popular stories of the year.

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Spotlight

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With concern about climate change growing, understanding how plants adapt to their environment has become an important focus for research. Which genes govern drought resistance? Which genes respond to weather and climate conditions? A recent study...

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With cloud computing enabling new research collaborations and providing stimulus for economic growth, there was plenty to shout about at last week’s Cloudscape VII event in Brussels, Belgium. Read iSGTW’s in-depth report......

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The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope will provide an unprecedented look into the cosmos, and the Dark Energy Science Collaboration is preparing a variety of analyses for the huge data sets it will produce. In anticipation of their needs, Fermilab is...

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