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21 December 2011

Few laypeople think of computing innovation in connection with the Tevatron particle accelerator, which shut down earlier this year. Mention of the Tevatron inspires images of majestic machinery, or thoughts of immense energies and groundbreaking physics research, not circuit boards, hardware, networks, and software.

Yet over the course of more than three decades of planning and operation, a tremendous amount of computing innovation was necessary to keep the data flowing and physics results coming. Those innovations will continue to influence scientific computing and data analysis for years to come.

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This year, the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) turned 10. It was September 2001 when the idea was concieved of and approved by the CERN council to handle the large volumes of data.

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What were you reading in 2011? We re-cap the most popular stories of the year.

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Spotlight

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To keep up with growing demand from its network of users, RNP, the Brazilian national research and education network, has turned to a hybrid, community, federated cloud to supply its services. The hybrid model allows RNP to act as a public (...

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UC San Diego School of Medicine scientists have teamed up with Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center engineers to create 3D models of enzymes that cause inflammation. What they've learned could bring relief to victims of asthma and arthritis.

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Eliminating internal and external barriers affecting national research and education networks (NRENs) in the UbuntuNet Alliance membership region should be the core of the NREN agenda in 2015, argues distinguished NREN advocate Duncan Martin.

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