Share |

21 December 2011

Few laypeople think of computing innovation in connection with the Tevatron particle accelerator, which shut down earlier this year. Mention of the Tevatron inspires images of majestic machinery, or thoughts of immense energies and groundbreaking physics research, not circuit boards, hardware, networks, and software.

Yet over the course of more than three decades of planning and operation, a tremendous amount of computing innovation was necessary to keep the data flowing and physics results coming. Those innovations will continue to influence scientific computing and data analysis for years to come.

4.64516

This year, the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) turned 10. It was September 2001 when the idea was concieved of and approved by the CERN council to handle the large volumes of data.

4.166665

What were you reading in 2011? We re-cap the most popular stories of the year.

4
Spotlight

You Might Have Missed

 

iSGTW speaks to Derek Groen, a post-doctoral researcher from the Centre for Computational Science at University College London (UCL), UK. He’ll be presenting his work into the optimization of hemodynamics simulation code at ISC’...

4

The straightforward, self-contained anatomical features of the aortic valve make it easily replaceable if it incurs damage or wears out. The mitral valve, on the other hand, is complex and interconnected, so changes in one area cause outcomes in...

4.4

Microprocessors are pervasive, rarely seen necessities of modern life, hiding out in electronic devices of all shapes and sizes. Researchers are looking at how 3D technology can help improve performance and energy efficiency in the next generation...

3.5

During its cooling and rapid expansion, the universe underwent a phase transition from a Quark-Gluon-Plasma state to form hadrons (protons and neutrons), the building blocks of matter as we know it.

One of the main tasks in relativistic...

4.333335