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21 December 2011

Few laypeople think of computing innovation in connection with the Tevatron particle accelerator, which shut down earlier this year. Mention of the Tevatron inspires images of majestic machinery, or thoughts of immense energies and groundbreaking physics research, not circuit boards, hardware, networks, and software.

Yet over the course of more than three decades of planning and operation, a tremendous amount of computing innovation was necessary to keep the data flowing and physics results coming. Those innovations will continue to influence scientific computing and data analysis for years to come.

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This year, the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) turned 10. It was September 2001 when the idea was concieved of and approved by the CERN council to handle the large volumes of data.

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What were you reading in 2011? We re-cap the most popular stories of the year.

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Spotlight

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Depending on the participatory research of community and citizen scientists, COASST, funded by the US National Science Foundation, initially focused on collecting data on beached seabird carcasses as an indicator of coastal health. The team now...

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Domenico Talia will speak about big-data mining and knowledge discovery at ISC Big Data in Heidelberg, Germany, on 1-2 October. Talia, who is a professor of computer engineering at the University of Calabria in Italy, will explain how cloud...

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The Research Data Alliance (RDA) is set to hold its Fourth Plenary Meeting in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, on 22-24 September. The event will showcase the first concrete outputs from several of the organization's working groups. Many exciting co-...

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The latest European Grid Infrastructure case study describes how researchers in The Netherlands have used the e-BioInfra Gateway to analyze brain scans from NATO soldiers deployed to Afghanistan. The team discovered that combat stress impairs...

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