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2 November 2011

Swedish researchers have developed a computer model that is better at matching transplant candidates to living donors than traditional methods, and as a result could improve long-term survival rates for transplant recipients.

Weight, gender, age, blood group (of both donor and recipient), and the time when no blood flows to the heart during a transplant are just some of the numerous variables that can affect a patient’s survival chances after transplantation.

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A complex and unique virtual ecosystem simulation running on a computing grid could help biologists answer the puzzling questions about the way ecosystems function.

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Can computational evolutionary finance explain who were the 'black sheep' in the global financial crisis of 2008 and prepare us for future ones?

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