Share |

2 November 2011

Swedish researchers have developed a computer model that is better at matching transplant candidates to living donors than traditional methods, and as a result could improve long-term survival rates for transplant recipients.

Weight, gender, age, blood group (of both donor and recipient), and the time when no blood flows to the heart during a transplant are just some of the numerous variables that can affect a patient’s survival chances after transplantation.

4

A complex and unique virtual ecosystem simulation running on a computing grid could help biologists answer the puzzling questions about the way ecosystems function.

4.4

Can computational evolutionary finance explain who were the 'black sheep' in the global financial crisis of 2008 and prepare us for future ones?

4.846155
Spotlight

You Might Have Missed

 

High-energy cosmic beams hit the Earth’s outer atmosphere, which in turn scatters these rays into a shower of particle decays. A team of CERN openlab summer students has used a recent ‘webfest’ event held at CERN to build a...

3.5

Modern farming practices are often blamed for the rise in greenhouse gas emissions. A new big data analysis indicates change in land use might be as much to blame. With an eye to best practices, researchers see solutions to mitigate these...

3.5

The world population is expected to reach 9 billion by 2044. Thanks to an international team of genetic researchers, clothing our burgeoning global family has just gotten a little easier.

3