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19 October 2011

The quest to produce power from fusion is back on track after the test-bed reactor JET restarted successfully. But some serious challenges, which require heavy computing, still lie on the scientists' path between here and realising their dream.

Scientists are installing extremely sensitive infra-red cameras to find tiny hot-spots in the walls of the container, which might show why and where energy is lost. And they must also tackle one of the most important unsolved problems of classical physics: turbulance.

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Most researchers blame the hole in the ozone layer for the mysterious growth in Antarctic sea ice. But more detailed simulations suggest that the cause may be more complex.

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The Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment and National Lambda Rail partner to bring a more flexible networking infrastructure to XSEDE.

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