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12 October 2011

40% of rejected drugs developed by the pharmaceutical industry fail due to their adverse affects on the heart. Now, researchers from the preDiCT project have built the most accurate computer models ever to help the pharmaceutical industry know which drugs are more likely to disrupt electrical activity in the heart. 

PreDiCT is just one of 26 projects that are part of the Virtual Physiological Human Initiative - it's goal is the creation of a 'virtual you', down to your face, skin, muscle, bones and DNA. These simulations will greatly improve disease, drug and health treatments for the public.

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Mobile devices represent an untapped resource that we can harness using grid computing techniques.

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The LHC is one of the biggest, most complex machines in the world. And physicists are reviving the volunteer computing project Sixtrack, part of LHC@Home, to design the 2020 upgrade.

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